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Read and translate the following dialogues.

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Unit 1.1 Conversational formulas

Unit 1.2 Great Britain

Unit 1.3 Ukraine

2. ij

Unit 2.1 Business trip. At the airport. At the railway station. At the customs office. At the hotel

Unit 2.2 Application form. Curriculum vitae. Job interview

Unit 2.3 The structure of a typical company. Organization and presenting your own company

Unit 2.4 Negotiations

Unit 2.5 Means of communication

Unit 2.6 Business documents. Contracts. Types of contracts. Main clauses of contracts

Texts for additional reading

Literature

 


1. -

UNIT 1.1. CONVERSATIONAL FORMULAS

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. Pre-reading stage:

1) What certain rules or formulas do we follow while meeting and greeting people?

2) What are the questions we are usually asked?

3) What is the goal of small talk?

1. Study the following words and combinations:

1. a ritual way -

2. formulas -

3. a handshake -

4. a nod of the head -

5. a hand gesture -

6. to engage in -

7. a chitchat - ,

8. to be designed to -

9. to break the ice -

 

10. a terminal illness -

11. a repartee - '

12. a goal-

13. to elicit -

14. obviously -

15. superficial -

16. a mode -

17. restrictive -

18. an associate -

19. challenge-

20. awkward -

. While-reading stage:

2. Read and translate the following text.

TEXT 1. SIMPLY SOCIALIZING

In the United States, as elsewhere, there is a ritual way to meet and greet people. We follow certain rules or formulas. Along with the handshake, nod of the head, hug, or hand gesture, we engage in small talk. This light conversation or chitchat may not carry much meaning in itself, but, rather, is designed to "break the ice"- to ease into a conversation with someone you have just met.


Although the order of questions may vary, the same questions are always asked, and the same remarks made: "How are you?" is answered by "Fine, thanks" or "How are you?" This is not an inquiry into your physical health; it is a standard greeting. A "Fine, thank you" is what is expected, even if your best friend was just diagnosed with a terminal illness.

You always engage in small talk when you first meet someone. If you do not take part in this polite type of repartee, you will be considered rude and unfriendly; therefore, it is essential to learn the formulas. Surprisingly to some, the goal of small talk is to get to know someone, yet you should never ask personal questions too soon; instead, you start with questions or comments that elicit an expected response. This tells you if the person you are talking to is willing to communicate with you and, if so, on what level. You can then decide if you wish to continue talking or not, and whether you can move the conversation in another directions.

Small talk can take place between people who know each other, or at first- time meetings. Obviously, when meeting someone for the first time, you are limited in what you may say and what you may not say. You do not want to be rude by asking personal questions or saying anything negative.

Americans, in particular, engage in so much small talk that they are often seen as superficial or boring. Foreigners may not have the opportunity to see them in a more serious mode and assume they continue to talk about the weather and sports long after they have gone home. Of course, some people do; however, for the most part, small talk is a respective and unnatural type of communication, not typical of private discourse.

the business world, there is small talk until a relationship is established, after which one may talk specifically about business or personal concerns. After business hours, when socializing with colleagues or associates, you will need to know the acceptable topics of conversation: weather, sports, good news, travel, positive comments about your host country, movies, entertainment, food, or the challenger of learning a foreign language. If asked, you may discuss work, where you live, or where you are staying. After work hours, when people want to relax, discussions about work or anything too serious are usually not welcomed.

Subjects to avoid are: money, prices, personal health, bad news, religion, politics, and details about your family or children (unless specifically asked).

Finally, be careful about jokes! Humor varies from culture to culture, and you may offend without realizing it; there are few things more awkward than an unfunny joke, or one that is in bad taste. People have very specific ideas about good and bad taste; you may be walking on dangerous ground when you attempt a joke and you may never realize how our joke was received because people may laugh out of politeness - or perhaps sympathy.

Small talk may last from a few minutes to over an hour, depending upon circumstances. At its best, it results in a nice impression being made, a common interest being explored, or a rapport created that could be the basis of a future meeting or more serious relationship.


III. Post-reading stage:

3. Consult a dictionary, read and translate the following words:


to greet

a rule

a conversation

to ease

to be limited

in particular

an opportunity


although to vary a remark an inquiry to assume a relationship acceptable


to expect

to diagnose

to take part

polite

a host country

entertainment

to relax


to consider

rude

essential

surprisingly

to avoid

to offend

dangerous


personal

to be willing to

to continue

to move

an impression

to explore

a rapport


4. Complete these sentences with the words from the text:

1. In the United States, as elsewhere, there is a ritual way to....

2. Along with the handshake ... we engage in small talk.

3. This light conversation or chitchat may not carry much meaning in itself, but, rather, is designed to "break the ice"... .

4. If you do not take part in this polite type of repartee, you will be considered ....

5. Surprisingly to some, the goal of small talk is to ....

6. Small talk can take place between people who ....

7. After business hours, when socializing with colleagues or associates, you will need to know the acceptable topics of conversation ....

8. Subjects to avoid are ... .

9. People have very specific ideas about....
10. Small talk may last from ....

5. Agree or disagree with the following statements:

1. Just in the United States there is a ritual way to meet and greet people.

2. Along with the handshake, nod of the head, hug, or hand gesture, we engage in small talk.

3. To "break the ice" means to ease into a conversation with someone you have just met.

4. You always engage in small talk when you first meet someone.

5. If you do not take part in this polite type of repartee, you will be considered friendly.

6. The goal of small talk is to get to know someone.

7. You should always ask personal questions when you first meet someone.

8. When meeting someone for the first time, you aren't limited in what you may say and what you may not say.

9. After work hours, when people want to relax, discussions about work or anything too serious are usually not welcomed.

10. People don't have any specific ideas about good and bad taste.

6. Translate the following sentences:

1. .

2. , " "- , .


 

3. ', .

4. , .

5. , , , .

6. .

7. , , .

8. , , , ', , , ' .

7. Answer the following questions:

1. What ways of meeting and greeting people do you know?

2. What does it mean "to break the ice"?

3. How can you answer the question "How are you?"

4. Why is it essential to learn the formulas of greeting people?

5. Why should you never ask personal questions when you first meet someone?

6. Why are Americans often seen as superficial or boring?

7. What acceptable topics of conversation do you know?

8. What are the subjects to avoid?

9. Why do you have to be careful about jokes?

DIALOGUES

I. Pre-reading stage:

1. Read and learn the following conversational formulas:


Greetings

How do you do?

Hello! Hi! (to a friend)

Good morning!

Good afternoon!

Good evening!

Good night!

What luck running into you!

What a lucky chance to meet you!

Very glad to see you again.

I have not seen you for ages!

How are you?

How goes it?

How are things?

How's all the family?

What's the news?

The news is interesting.

Bad news has wings.

No news is good news.


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How's life?

How's your health?

Thank you, very well (fine).

Thanks, not bad (could be better),

(could be worse).

Couldn't be worse.

So-so.

None too bright.

Bright. Great.

Lively.

Never better.

I am quite well, thank you.

Saying Good-bye

Good-bye.

Good-bye and good luck.

Bye-bye (So long).

See you later (soon).

See you tomorrow.

See you on Sunday.

Cheerio.

Acquaintance

Let me introduce you to my friend.

Let me introduce captain Kozachenko

to you.

Let me introduce myself.

My name is ...

I want to introduce you.

Allow me to introduce you to my wife.

Permit me to introduce my husband to you.

This is my son Igor.

Meet Mr. Boyko.

I'd like you to meet my sister, Ann.

I'm pleased to meet you Tom.

The pleasure is mine.

I don't think you have met Daniel Jones,

have you?

So am I.

It's mutual.

I'm happy to make your acquaintance

(to meet you).

I'm delighted to make your acquaintance.

I've been looking forward to meetning you.


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Gratitude

Thank you.

Many thanks.

Thanks so much.

I don't know how to thank you.

I'm very obliged to you.

So very obliging of you.

I'm very grateful to you.

Oh, my deep gratitude.

How kind of you.

Little thanks to you.

Your kindness is lost upon him.

Thank you for nothing.

Don't try to thank me.

I am gratified.

Not at all.

Don't mention it.

You are welcome.

It's a pleasure.

It's nothing.

Agreement. Disagreement

I'm afraid, I can't do that.

I'm sorry, I can't help you.

I agree with you.

I can't agree with you.

I disagree with you.

I don't think so.

I don't mean that.

Not quite so.

On the contrary.

I object to your proposal.

It's out of the question.

This is not true.

You are right.

You are wrong.

I'm afraid, you are mistaken.

At all costs, -j

By any means. L

At any price. J

By no means.

Not at all.

Certainly not.


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. While-reading stage:

DIALOGUE 3. AT THE OFFICE

- I'd like you to meet Mr. Pospelov, our Director General.

- Glad to meet you Mr. Pospelov.

- Glad to meet you too. Have you ever been to Kyiv before, Mr Cartwright?

- No, it's my first visit to Kyiv.

- What are your first impressions of Kyiv?

- I like Kyiv, it's a very beautiful city and quite different from London.

- I'll hope you'll enjoy your visit Mr. Cartwright.

- Let me introduce my staff to you. This is my secretary Miss Kravchenko.

- Nice to meet you, Miss Kravchenko.

- Nice to meet you too. Call me Ann.

- I also want you to meet Victor Volgin, Our Sales Manager. You've already r Mr. Ivanov.

- What does Mr. Ivanov do?

- He is our export-import Manager... Do take a seat. Would you like a cigarette?

- Yes, thank you.

- Would you like something?

- Er... Yes. I'd like a cup of coffee.

- Ann, could you make coffee for us, please?

- Certainly, sir. How would you like your coffee, Mr. Cartwright, black or white?

- Black, please.

- With sugar?

- No, thanks.

- By the way Mr. Cartwright, what is your profession?

- I'm an engineer, but at Continental Equipment I work as a Sales Manager. Here's my card.

- Let's get down to business, Mr. Cartwright. We're extending our business and want to buy equipment for producing some goods in Ukraine, rather than importing them from western countries as we do now. We know that some companies, including yours, produce the sort of equipment we need. Your company provides advanced technology and efficient service, which small companies can't provide. That's why we're interested in your company.

- Yes, I see. You'll be pleased to here that the service life of our equipment has been increased, and also prices have been reduced.

- Would you mind speaking a bit slower, Mr. Cartwright? I am not very good at English.

- Sure. I said we had increased the useful life of our equipment.


- It's very interesting, but first I would like to know if it's possible to adapt your equipment to our needs.

- To answer your question Mr. Pospelov, I have to visit your factory and study your requirements.

- I'll show you our factory tomorrow.

- What time?

- Let me see... I have an appointment with my lawyer at 9 a.m. How about 10?

- That's fine.

- At the moment we are looking for a Commercial Director for this project so in the future you'll have to deal with him. If we decide to buy your equipment, he'll visit your company and you'll discuss the contract with him in detail.

- Fine. I've got some advertising leaflets so you'll be able to study the main characteristics of our equipment yourself.

- Thank you, Mr. Cartwright. Our driver is at your disposal during your visit. His name is Oleg.

- Thank you very much, Mr. Pospelov.

- Well. That's all... our driver's waiting for you. He'll take you to your hotel.

- Good bye, Mr. Pospelov.

- Goodbye, Mr. Cartwright. See you tomorrow.


. Post-reading stage:3. Reply to the following:

1. How are you?

2. What's happening?

3. Nice weather, isn't it?

4. How's it going?


 

5. I'd like you to meet David Black.

6. What's up?

7. Nice to meet you.

8. Later!


UNIT 1.2. GREAT BRITAIN

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. Pre-reading stage:

1) What seas is Great Britain washed by?

2) What is Great Britain separated from the continent by?

3) What hills separate England from Scotland?

4) What is the population of Great Britain?

5) What are the main industrial centres of Great Britain?

6) Where has gas been found in Great Britain?

7) What is the climate of the British Isles?

1. Study the following words and combinations:

1. a coast - 7. lead -

2. copper - 8. marble -

3. damp- 9. meadow-

4. to follow - 10. mild - '

5. an island - 11. a mouth -

6. an isle - 12. slate -

II. While-reading stage:

2. Read and translate the text.

Report on the topic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      Great Britain        
    (Geography, General Information)      
                 
Capital: London   Main Rivers: The Thames The Tyne The Trent The Severn   Industry: Old branches: textile coal-mining metallurgy  
       
Parts: England(London); Scotland (Edinburgh); Wales (Cardiff); Northern Ireland (Belfast)    
     
       
        Modern branches: chemical industry electronics engineering  
    Main Lake: Loch Lomond Loch Ness Windermere    
Territory: 244,000 km    
       
Population: 56 mln.    
     
       
        Industrial Areas: the Greater London Lancashire Yorkshire Scotland Wales  
    Main Mountains: The Cheviot Hills The Pennines The Grampians The Cambrians    
Location: island country to the north-west of the Continent    
       
Washed by: the Atlantic Ocean(in the North and West); the North Sea (in the East);the Irish Sea (in the West); the Straits of Dover (in the South); the English Channel (in the South)    
         
  Peaks: Ben Nevis Snowdown   Industrial centres: London, Manchester, Birmingham, etc.  
         
         
    Natural Resources: coal, iron, lead, tin, copper,  
Borders on: Ireland   slate, salt, china-clay, granite      

I. Pre-reading stage:

1. Study the following words and combinations:

1. an advancement -

2. an affair -

3. to appoint -

4. an approval - ()

5. a castle -

6. election -

7. a commander-in-chief-

8. community - ,

9. to compose -

 

10. confidence -

11. considerable -

12. contribution - ,

13. to exercise - '

14. to flow -

15. to gain -

16. hereditary -

17. to inherit -

 

18. thistle - ,

19. woolsack -

20. legislature - ,

21. peer (peeress) - (),

22. proceedings -

23. to provide -

24. to reign -

25. Remarkable -

26. to run/to rule -

27. salary -

28. shadow cabinet -

29. suffrage - ,

30. substantial - ,

31. supply -

32. to win -

33. to be vested in -

. While-reading stage:

1. Read and translate the text.

UNIT 1.3. UKRAINE

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ECONOMIC RELATIONS

On the map of the world you can find a new independent state with a thousand-year-old history - Ukraine. It borders on Belarus and Russia in the north and in the east. In the west Ukraine is bounded by Moldova, Romania, Hungary, Slovakia and Poland. Great areas are occupied by steppes and forest-steppe regions. The main part of Ukraine is located in the watershed of the Dnipro River, which divides Ukraine into two parts: Right-Bank and Left-Bank Ukraine.

The territory of our country has an astonishing variety of landscapes. We have high mountains, endless forests, beautiful rivers and lakes. The largest lake of Ukraine is Swit-yaz, its total area is 24.2 sq.km and the depth is 58.5 metres.

Within the borders of Ukraine we find the Carpathian Mountains with the highest peak Hoverla (2061) which is located in the Chornohora massif.

The Crimean Mountains stretch in three parallel ranges. The Main Range is the highest, rising to 1500 m above sea level. Its highest peak is Roman Kosh (1545 m.).

To have an idea of Ukraine's economic potential and define the scale of reforms which must be carried out let us get acquainted with some objective data. Ukraine is situated in the geographical center of Europe. The country occupies a territory of 604 thousand square kilometers. Ukrainian's population is 48 million, more than 74 percent of whom are Ukrainians. For comparison the population of Germany is 79.7 million people, Great Britain - 57, Poland - 39, Finland - 5. Ten million ethnic Ukrainians live outside the country on the territories of the former Soviet Union, and close to 5 million live in other foreign countries. The diaspora is the strongest in Canada and the USA. There are 6 cities in Ukraine with a population of over 1 million.

Ukraine takes a leading place in iron ore extraction, production of steel, cast iron, tractors, mineral fertilizers, sugar, and grain; it also succeeded in coal mining, producing concrete, electric energy and various equipments.

In the south of the country Ukraine has access to the Black Sea and the Sea of Above which are connected with the ocean. Twenty-seven thousand kilometers of railroads intertwine throughout the territory of Ukraine.

Oil and gas pipelines of international significance go through the territory of Ukraine. Fees from transit oil and gas pipelines pay for most of the imported products. Ukraine's main importers of oil and gas are Russia and Turkmenistan. In spite of great reserves of coal, the importance of rock-coal in the energy balance is decreasing, and this tendency will continue in the future because the layers are located very deep and their extraction becomes more and more costly. That is why Ukraine should pay more attention to regeneration sources of energy: solar, wind, hydrothermal, and even more attention to resources and energy saving technologies.

Steppes and plains compose the most part of the territory of Ukraine. The top soils are mainly black. They are the biggest treasure of the Ukrainian land. 25 percent of world's black rich soils are in Ukraine. Together with the fact, that Ukraine's climate is mainly moderately continental, it allows for considerable progress in agricultural produc-


tion under the conditions of market economy. Sugar beets, wheat, rye, barley, oats, corn, sun flower, flax, buckwheat, potatoes, onions, tomatoes, cabbages, also a large variety of grain cultures, fruits and vegetables are grown in Ukraine.

Because of her potential Ukraine is an industrial-agricultural country. Her machine-building potential includes tractors and agricultural machine-building, production of diesel locomotives and railroad cars, automobiles, rockets, sea and river vessels, refrigerators, TV-sets, electric motors, equipment for metallurgic, chemical, mine and textile industries.

Natural and human recourses are sufficient for creating a developed internal market and becoming a friendly and equal partner in the world market.


3. Find equivalents in two columns:

To border

To divide

Neighbour

Fertile black soil

Coal

Iron ore

Oil

Oil pipeline

Independence

Non ferrous metallurgy

Sugar beet

Flax

Sunflower

To deteriorate

Cast iron

Concrete

To decrease

Energy saving technologiese


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4. Translate the following words and word combinations:

Rock-coal, great reserves, extraction, mineral fertilizers, sea level, moderately continental, considerable progress, rye, barley, oats, buckwheat, cabbages, vessel, to create, internal market.

5. Use proper tense-forms of the verbs. Translate the sentences.

1. Ukraine (to have) many rivers.

2. The Dnipro (to divide) Ukraine into two parts: Left-bank and Right-bank territories.

3. Ukraine (to take) a leading place in iron ore extraction, production of steel, cast iron, tractors, mineral fertilizers, sugar, and grain.

4. Twenty-seven thousand kilometers of railroads (to intertwine) throughout the territory of Ukraine.

5. In spite of great reserves of coal, the importance of rock-coal in the energy balance (to decrease), and this tendency (to continue) in the future because the layers are located very deep and their extraction (to become) more and more costly.



6. Steppes and plains (to compose) the most part of the territory of Ukraine.

7. The top soils (to be) mainly black.

8. Natural and human recourses (to be) sufficient for creating a developed internal market and becoming a friendly and equal partner in the world market.


W. Practice Drills:

1. Speak on the topic "Geographical Position of Ukraine



Use the chart.


POLITICAL SYSTEM OF UKRAINE

Ukraine is a sovereign state. On June 16, 1990 the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine passed the Declaration of State Sovereignty of Ukraine. On August 24,1991, Ukraine's independence and the formation of the independent state of Ukraine was proclaimed by the Ukrainian Parliament.

On December 1,1991, an all-Ukrainian referendum was held, involving 84.18 percent of citizens.

Winning 61.6 percent of the votes, L.Kravchuk, the former head of the Verkhovna Rada, was elected President of Ukraine.

In 1994 L.Kuchma won the Presidential elections and became the new President of Ukraine.

A new state, Ukraine, appeared on the world political map in 1991. It is a democratic state, which is ruled by the law. It includes 24 administrative regions and the Autonomous Republic of the Crimea. Ukraine has its own Constitution, which was adopted in 1996. The Constitution of Ukraine consists of 15 chapters (161 articles). The day of its adoption (June, 28, 1996) is a state holiday - the Day of the Constitution of Ukraine.

The political system of Ukraine is really democratic. The powers of the Government are divided into legislative, executive and judicial. The President is the head of the state. He is elected for a term of five years. The highest body of the executive power is the Cabinet of Ministers. It is responsible to the President and is accountable to the Verkhovna Rada. It carries out domestic and foreign policy of the state.

The Verkhovna Rada (Parliament) is the only body of the legislative power in Ukraine. It includes 450 deputies who are elected for a term of five years. The Verkhovna Rada adopts the State Budget and controls the execution of it.

Judicial power in Ukraine is led by the Supreme Court.

There are very many political parties in Ukraine. The main parties are: the Social Democratic Party, the People's Rukh of Ukraine, the Batkivshchyna, the Communist Party, the Women of Ukraine.

The National Emblem of Ukraine is a Golden Tryzub (trident) on a blue shield. The National Flag of Ukraine is a rectangular cloth with two horizontal stripes of equal width, the upper colored blue and the lower golden yellow. The National Anthem has been performed since January 1992 (music by M.M. Verbytsky).

The National Holiday, Independence Day, is celebrated on August 24.

Now Ukraine establishes new relations with countries throughout the world. It sets direct contacts with them signing agreement and treaties.


III. Post-reading stage:

3. Give Ukrainian equivalents for the following:

to elect the national anthem

to divide domestic policy

to rule to be accountable to

to carry out foreign policy

the Supreme Court

4. Give English equivalents for the following:

( )

5. Agree or disagree with the following statements:

1. On August 24, 1991, Ukraine's independence was proclaimed by the Ukrainian Parliament

2. The Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine is the only body of the executive power.

3. Ukraine includes 24 administrative regions and the Autonomous Republic of the Crimea.

4. The powers of the government are divided into legislative, executive and judicial.

5. The National Holiday, Independence Day, is celebrated on August 28.

6. In 1993 L.Kuchma won the Presidential elections and became the President oi Ukraine.

7. L.Kravchuk was the first President of Ukraine.

6. Answer the following questions:

1. When did the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine pass the Declaration of State Sover eignty.

2. Who proclaimed Ukraine's independence?

3. What event took place in Ukraine on December 1, 1991?

4. Who was elected the first President of Ukraine?

5. When did L.Kuchma become the President of Ukraine?

6. How many regions does Ukraine include?

7. How are the powers of the government divided into?

8. What is the National Emblem of Ukraine?

9. Who was music to the National Anthem written by?

 

10. When is Independence Day celebrated?

11. When is the Day of the Constitution of Ukraine celebrated?


7. Speak on the topic "Political System of Ukraine". Use the chart:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Ukraine Democratic republic  
       
  President The head of the country  
       
  Elected for 5 years ; resident in Ukraine last 10 years; older 35  
         
         
Cabinet of Ministers (executive power)          
  Parliament (Verkhovna Rada) (legislative power)   Supreme Court (judicial power)
       
         
Headed by Prime-Minister      
        Chief Justice; Associate Justices
  450 members (elected for 4 years) residence in Ukraine last 5 years, older 21  
       
         
The First Ice prime- Three vice-ministers  
minister          
             
  Main parties: The Social Democratic Party; the People's Rukh of Ukraine; the Communist Party; the Women of Ukraine    
                           

IV. Practice Drills:

1. Role-play the following situations;

Situation 1.Paula Smith, a British guide of the Ukrainian students in London is going to visit Ukraine. She is interested in information on Ukraine. Answer her questions on geographical position, history, natural resources of Ukraine.

Situation 2.A student of the Law faculty is taking an exam in the Constitutional Law of Ukraine. He has difficulty with the question about the political structure of Ukraine. The teacher asks him questions and helps to reveal the question about the political system of Ukraine.

Situation 3.A young businessman has a possibility to invest money in the development of our country. He is interested in Ukrainian industry. Prove him that investing money in the development of industry will give a profit. Tell him about the main industrial centres of Ukraine.

Useful expressions:I'd like to say a few words about - ...; As know - ; think that - ; Quite on the contrary -; Certainly - ; (Could) Can I ask you - ; want


to give a few examples to prove it - , ; As far as I know - ; am interested in - ; What can you say about - ...; You are welcome - ; Thank you - .

I. Pre-reading stage:

1. Study the following words and combinations:

to set contacts -

an agreement -

a treaty -

joint venture -

to provide -

to enable -

to implant -

to be run -

Embassy -

2. Look through the text "Ukrainian-British relations". Be ready to answer the follow
ing questions:

1. How does Ukraine set new contacts with foreign countries?

2. When did Ukraine and Great Britain establish diplomatic relations?

3. What does Know-how fund offer?

4. What are the aims of fund programmes?

5. Which possibilities does the British Council provide?

. While-reading stage:

3. Read and translate the text.

UKRAINIAN-BRITISH RELATIONS

Since Ukraine became an independent state, it has become to establish new relations with the countries throughout the world. It sets direct contacts with many foreign countries, signing agreements and treaties. A lot of joint ventures in the leading industries have appeared recently in our cities and towns. Many delegations, businesmen, specialists and tourists from other countries keep coming to Ukraine. Scientific contacts are also very important.

In 1992 Ukraine and Great Britain established diplomatic relations and since then Ukraine has got its Embassy which is situated in the center of London.

It's not secret that Ukraine passes through a difficult period of time. In Great Britain there are organizations which support the development of Ukrainian sciences, economy, and project cultural contacts. One of such organizations is Know-How fund of the British government. The fund offers different programmes for managers, providing them with management training courses in Great Britain. The main objectives of these programmes are: to introduce managers to the market economy and to enable them to get practical experience of management in market conditions, so that they can implant reforms of their own enterprises.

 

British Council offices have been opened in main cities of Ukraine to support English language training in Ukraine. British Council Center offers a wide choice of English books, textbooks, cassettes and video films for teaching of English. Computer Literacy Courses and Seminars on teaching English are regularly run in the Center, besides each year the British Council sends 30 - 40 Ukrainian teachers of English to the UK to participate in British Council summer schools.

There are many other progpammes for students, young scientists and specialists in different fields, which are implemented by the British Council. The cultural and scientific exchange is going on.

III. Post-reading stage:

4. Give the Ukrainian equivalents to the following.

Direct contacts Practical experience

Management training courses To sign an agreement

Main objectives A wide choice

Market conditions To establish new relations

5. Ask your friend all possible questions to the following sentences.

Model:Ukraine passes through a difficult period of time.

Does Ukraine pass through a difficult period of time?

What period does Ukraine pass through?

Does Ukraine pass through a difficult or an easy period of time?

What country passes through a difficult period of time?

Ukraine passes through a difficult period of time, doesn't it?

1. Ukraine is establishing new economic relations throughout the world.

2. In 1992 Ukraine and Great Britain established diplomatic relations.

3. In Great Britain there are organizations which support the development of Ukrainian sciences, economy, and project cultural contacts.

4. The Know-How fund offers different programmes for managers.

5. The cultural and scientific exchange is going on.

6. Say it in English:

1. .

2. ' .

3. , , .

4. .

5. .


DIALOGUE 1

Camp: Hallo, is that" Avantis"?

Secretary: Yes, who is that speaking, please.

Camp: This is Camp of Roberts & Co. I'd like to speak to Mr. Bunin.

Secretary: Just a moment. I'll put you through.

Camp: Thank you.

Bunin: Bunin speaking.

Camp: Good afternoon Mr. Bunin. I've received the final reply from our firm. We

accept your offer, but I'd like to clear up some points. When shall we meet? Bunin: I'll be glad to see you any time tomorrow.

Camp: Will the contract be ready by that time?

Bunin: Yes, certainly it will.

Camp: Well, you see, I'm leaving for London on the 15th of April.

Bunin: I believe that'll be next Sunday.

Camp: Yes, quite so.

Bunin: I think we've done good business Mr. Camp. Will you join me for dinner

next Saturday? Camp: Yes, with pleasure.

Bunin: I'll call for you at the hotel at about six then. Camp: Thank you. Good-bye, Mr. Bunin.

Bunin: Good-bye.

III. Post-reading stage:

AT THE AIRPORT

I. Pre-reading stage:

1) What useful words and expressions are used in the dialogue?

2) What questions can you ask while buying airline tickets?

1. Study the following words and word combinations:

1. to book a flight -

2. a non- stop flight -

3. a direct flight -

4. a morning (evening) flight - ()

5. a non-smoking (smoking) seat - , ()

6. an aisle seat -

7. a window seat-

8. a business class (coach, first class) ticket - - (, )

9. one-way fare -

 

10. a round-trip fare -

11. a refundable (non-refundable) ticket - , ( )

. While-reading stage:

TEXT 2. GOING ABROAD

GOING ABROAD

Avantis got instructions to buy chemical equipment abroad. With this in view Mr. Bunin, President of this firm went on business to Great Britain to place an order with a British firm.

He phoned the booking-office to book a seat for a plane to London. He found out that there were flights daily and that it would take him three and a half hours to get to London.

Mr. Bunin booked a seat for the Boeing 747 jet-liner. The next morning he had arrived at Borispil airport by seven o'clock, an hour before the plane took off.

After the clerk had registered his ticket and passport, Bunin filled in a declaration and went to the waiting room. There were a few passengers there.

They were all waiting for the announcement to get on the plane. In ten minutes they heard the announcement," Attention, please. Will passengers for London join Flight 31?"

When Mr. Bunin got on the plane, the stewardess showed him his seat. At eight o'clock the plane took off. Although it flew at a high speed, the Passengers felt well. At 11.30 a.m. the plane landed at London airport.

a.m. = ante meridium - 24.00 12.00. p.m. = post meridium - 12.00 24.00.

TEXT 3. ACCOMMODATIONS

DIALOGUE 5. AT THE HOTEL

Pre-reading stage:

1) What information did Mr. Bunin write in the form?

2) What useful phrases can you use at the hotel?

1. Study the following words and word combinations:

1. to reserve a room -

2. receptionist -

3. reception-desk -

4. accommodation - ,

5. charge -

 

6. hotel-porter -

7. to fill in a form -

8. occupation -

9. to lock -

 

10. a tip -

11. to pack -

12. a luggage porter -

13. to check out -

14. traveller's checks -

15. foreign currency -

16. to leave a message for someone -

17. to take a tour of the city -

18. the front desk -

II. While-reading stage:

ACCOMMODATIONS

At about 10 o'clock in the morning Mr.Bunin arrived at Traveller's Inn. A hotel-porter took his suitcase and showed him to the reception-desk. Bunin told the receptionist about that he had reserved a room a few days before. The receptionist checked that and said that they could let him have a nice room on the third floor. After that the receptionist gave Mr. Bunin a form and asked him to fill it in.

Mister Bunin wrote his name, address, nationality and occupation on the form and gave it back. Then the porter took the key to Bunin's room and they went to the lift. In a minute they were on the third floor. The porter unlocked the door, brought in the suitcase and asked if that was all. Bunin thanked him, gave him a tip and the porter went out.

DIALOGUE 5. AT THE HOTEL

Desk Clerk: Good morning, sir. Can I help you?

Bunin: Yes, please. I made a reservation for a single room, non-smoking, under the

name of Bunin.

Desk Clerk: Yes, here we are. Five days at the corporate rate. Non- smoking room. Here is

your key. Do you have any luggage?

Bunin: Just one small suitcase. I don't need a porter. I can handle it by myself.

Desk Clerk: Very good, sir. If there is anything else you need, just call the front desk.

Bunin: Actually, I would like to order a snack in my room. Do you have room

service?

Desk Clerk: Yes, I'll send someone up right away.

Bunin: Thank you. Has anyone left any messages for me? Desk Clerk: No, sir.

Bunin: I wonder if you could tell me where there's a nice restaurant nearby?

Desk Clerk: Directly across the street, there are two that are popular.

Bunin: Thanks a lot. Desk Clerk: My pleasure. Enjoy your stay!

 

 

 

III. Post- reading stage:

JOB INTERVIEW

( . . '.

³ )

: , , . :

, ;

, , , , .

. Pre-reading stage:

1) What does a person have to fill in if he/she is eager to get a job?

2) What information should a CV contain?

 

1. Read and learn the words:

1 .CV (Curriculum Vitae) -

2. to look for smth -

3. to be eager to do smth -

4. to fill in -

5. to lay (laid, laid) -


6. to lay out -

7. a lay-out - ,

8. to assess -

9. an a

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