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From an Employer, refusing a Request from an Employee

____________________________________________________________________________

February 27th.

Dear Mr. Jones,

I am sorry I am not able to increase your salary at present. I think you are adequately paid for the work you do. I will however bear your application in mind, and, if you are able to convince me you are worth more, I will see what I can do for you at the end of the year.

Yours faithfully,

H. I. Stone.

Taking up a Reference

_____________________________________________________________________________

Private and Confidential. September 4th.

Dears Sirs,

Mr. J. L. Cotterell, of ___, tells me he was employed by you for four years as a ledger clerk. He has applied to me for similar employment, and I should be very much obliged if you would let me know if you found him competent and trustworthy, and also the reason for his leaving your employ. Needless to say, your letter will be treated as strictly confidential, and I hope you will write me frankly. A stamped addressed envelope is enclosed for reply.

Yours truly,

P.L. Howard.

Giving favourable Reference

Confidential September 6th.

Dear Sir,

In reply to your letter of the 4th inst., making inquiries about Mr. J. L. Cotterell, I may say that I am sure you will find him satisfactory as a ledger clerk in every way. He is a careful and conscientious worker, and I know nothing against his character. The reason he left our employ was that our ledgers are now kept at our head office in Manchester, and Mr. Cotterell did not wish to leave London.

Yours faithfully,

V. 5. Pelton.

Giving qualified Reference

Private and Confidential September 5th,

Dear Sir,

In reply to your letter of the 4th inst., making inquiries about Mr. J. L. Cotterell, I may say that I always found him a competent ledger clerk. He thoroughly understands his work and is quick and accurate. The reason I dismissed him is because he has lately given way to intemperance. However, losing this post has been a sever lesson to him, and I think, if you are able to keep a firm hand over him, you might not be troubled with this failing. Otherwise he is of excellent character.

Yours truly,

V. S. Pelton.

19. Refusing Reference

Confidential. September 5th. Dear Sir,

In reply to your letter of the 4th inst., making inquiries about Mr. J. L. Cotterell, I am sorry I am not able to recommend him, and I told Mr. Cotterell so when he left us. In the circumstances I prefer to say nothing more.

Yours faithfully,

V. S. Pelton.

LETTERS FROM AND TO COMMERCIAL TRAVELLERS

From a Firm, announcing a Call by its Traveller

January 4th.

Dear Sirs,

Our Mr. H. Walters will have the pleasure of calling upon you about the 10th of the month, when we hope to be favoured with your orders.

Yours faithfully,

For Scott & Holmes, Ltd.,

H, Smith.

Secretary.

From a Commercial Traveller, announcing a Call

Grand Hotel,

Worcester.

February24th.

Dear Sirs,

I shall be in Hereford next week, and hope to call upon you about, the 28th inst. I shall have stock rooms at the Royal Hotel, and as I have a wide range of all our new season's novelties I hope you will take an opportunity of inspecting them. I trust business has been booming lately and that you have a large order waiting for me.

Yours faithfully,

H. Walters.

From a Commercial Traveller, enclosing Orders

York Hotel,

Halifax

November 4th

Dear Sir,

I enclose herewith weekly report of business done, with order sheets, and statement of Accounts Collected.

On Monday I shall be at the Queen's Hotel, Wakefield, and on Thursday at the Waverley Hotel, Bradford.

Business is pretty brisk in the old lines, but I find considerable difficulty in booking orders for the more expensive goods. Traders seem afraid to take risks in view of the unsettled state of the market.

Yours faithfully,

H. Walters.

From a Commercial Traveller, making Suggestions for increasing Business

_____________________________________________________________________________

Western Hotel,

Harrogate.

December 1st.

Dear Sirs,

I enclose herewith weekly report of business done, with order sheets. On Monday I shall be at the Queen's Hotel, Bridlington, for the week.

Business has not been good here,and several of our old customers complained that we do not keep our stock sufficiently up-to-date. Mr. Martin, of ____, whom I have known for many years, showed me a wallet which Messrs. _____ $ ___ are putting out at $____ a dozen. It looked a very superior article to ours at $___ I enclose one for your a very superior article to ours at $ __. I enclose one for your inspection.

I find everywhere the demand is for smart, up-to-date novelties. The price should be reasonable, but that does not matter so much if there is only some new idea in the goods.

Yours faithfully,

H.Walters.

From a Commercial Traveller, suggesting special Terms

__________________________________________________________________________

Avon Hotel,

Bristol.

March 14th.

Dear Sirs,

I have had a long interview with Mr. Hamilton, the buyer for Messrs. Lang and Bowles, of the city. They do a large export trade, and he is very much interested in our cheaper leather lines. I think a very large order can be booked here, but there will have to be special terms. He has asked me what we could do in the way of extra discount on an order for 500 gross of the lines priced from 10/- to 111- a dozen. I have promised to let him know to-morrow, so will you please wire me on receiving this what is the best offer you can make? The order is worth $3, 000, and I think a special discount of 7 1/2% cash 30 days, in addition to trade and cash discounts, would secure it. The goods would all be exported and would not compete with traders in this counrty. Needless to say, I sfvouid not suggest extra discount V I could book the order on our usual terms, but I can see that is impossible. Also, if these lines sell well, there is every reason to expect further large repeat orders, possibly on more favourable terms.

Yours faithfully,

H. Walters.

To a Commercial Traveller, complaining of Business done

_____________________________________________________________________________

.December 4th.

Dear'Mr. Walters,

I should be glad to have some explanation from you as to why your orders are showing such a marked decrease. As you will appreciate this is very serious matter for us, and, unless you can hold out some definite hope of very great improvement, I shall have to consider what steps it is necessary for us to take in the matter. We have had no complaints of the quality of our stocks, and cannot see any reason why business should be bad. Please write me fully about the causes to which you attribute it.

Yours faithfully,

T. M. Powell.

Reply

_____________________________________________________________________________

Moors Hotel,

Whitby.

December 7th.

Dear Mr. Powell,

I am' sorry you should have cause to complain of a decrease in my orders. It has been worrying me very much, and I assure you it is not through 'any want of trying on my part. I have done all I can to keep my turnover up to its usual level, and to increase it, if possible, but traders simply will not buy. I think if you examine my sheets you will find 1 have booked as many orders as usual, but they are much smaller.

As to the causes, I think it is that, owing to the prolonged strike last year, traders are very short of money, and, as there is a talk of a renewal of the trouble, they are afraid to take risks and will only buy for their immediate requirements. There is a widespread feeling of nervousness about the future. I have received complaints about our stock being "novel enough, and about prices, but one expects these, and they have not been more numberous than usual. There is of course very keen competition, and Messrs.____. of Edinburgh, in particular, are showing a very attractive range of samples at low prices. There is also a great deal of Japanese stuff being offered and the low prices of these goods are very tempting to traders in their present mood.

I think possibly the orders are only postponed and not lost, and, if nothing unsettling happens, I may make up a lot of the lost ground on my next round. I am going to York next week, usually a very good centre, and I will write you again fully from there.

Yours faithfully,

H. Walters.

LETTERS IN REFERENCE TO ACCOUNTS

Note: For the sake of brevity Account is often written A/c in business correspondence.

Sending Cheque in Settlement of Account

_____________________________________________________________________________

March 18th.

Dear Sirs,

We have pleasure in enclosing herewith cheque for $204. 18c, in full settlement of your A/c, dated March 1st. The endorsement on the back of the cheque is sufficient acknowledgement.

Yours faithfully,

For Wilson & Sons,

H. Lough

Accountant.

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