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Stylistic Syntax: Syntactic Expressive Means

And Stylistic Devices

Assignment 1. Pick out the syntactic stylistic devices based ona) reduction, b) extension ofthe sentence model:

1) a rhetoric question; 2) polysyndeton; 3) parceling; 4) detachment; 5) repetition; 6) tautology; 7) aposiopesis; 8) inversion; 9) an apokoinu construction; 10) ellipsis; 11) asyndeton; 12) enumeration; 13) a nominative sentence; 14) parallel constructions.

Assignment 2. Point out separately thecases of1) elliptical sentences, 2) nominative sentences, 3) apokoinu constructions:

1. Malay Camp. A row of streets crossing another row of streets. (P. Abrahams). 2. "What did you divorce your husband for?" - "Two hundred dollars a month." 3. "Don't you think he's rather good-looking?" - "In a way." -"What kind of a way?" - "Away off." 4. There was no door led into the kitchen. (Sh. Anderson). 5. The day passed on. Noon, afternoon, evening. Sunset. (J. Galsworthy). 6. He was the man killed the deer. (R. P. Warren).

Assignment 3. Pick out tautology in the following sentences:

1. Pain, even slight pain, tends to isolate. Pain, such as he had to suffer, cuts the last linkswith society. (S. Chaplin). 2. The widow Douglas, she took me for her son. (M. Twain). 3. "What's the matter?" - "Nothing... everything. .. it's good news... news... well, Jean's much better. 4. And - now my Arvie's gone. Whatever will I and my children do? Whatever will I do? Whatever will I do?.. (H. Lawson). 5.1 can say no more, but blessings, blessings on all in the dear house I leave, prays. (W. Thackeray).

Assignment 4. Supply the missing words to indicatecases of repetition. Define the repetition types:

1. Avoid evil and it will ^ you. 2. Live not to 1JJm but eat to live. .^ for everything and everything in its place. 4. The alarm swept from lip to....._, from group to from street to . (M. Twain). 5. Nothing will come of ^ . 6. What is lost is ^. 7. The worst has come to AJA. 8. God defend me from my friends; from my enemies I can myself. 9. He's not fit to ^ others that cannot command himself. 10. He that hatches matches _ catches. 11. If the


mountain will not come to Mahammed, ^ must go to ^. 12. _. to you is like talking to the wall. 13. It was a ghost of a train, a Flying Dutchman of ^ a nightmare of ^. (R. Davis). 14. Nothing comes from .. 15. "That's a fine orJen mind you've got there!" "Open mind, my eye! We didn't come with ^ (M- Wilson). 16. Habit cures ^. 17. It's queer that you should be so different from Violet. is as hard as nails. (B. Shaw). 18. A crooked stick throws a _^ shadow.

Assignment 5. Change the word order to make the sentences grammatically and semantically correct:

1. Wanted, a situation as governess by a young lady aged 26 for three years. 2. Lost, an umbrella in Victoria by a lady with whalebone ribs. 3. Girl with wonderful personality wants work as maid in good family. Can cook and admire children.

Assignment 6. Determine stylistic and communicative functions of detachment; define the types of repetition in the following sentences:

1. You know what I mean. You look like a million dollars, I mean. (A. Sax-ton). 2.1 have seen old Flint in the corner there, behind you; as plain as print, I've seen him. (R. Stevenson). 3. "Serious from my heart - from my soul!" returned Mr. Winkle, with great energy. (Ch. Dickens). 4. "In a barrack, by Jove - I wish anybody in a barrack would say what you do," cried out this uproused British lion. (W Thackeray). 5. Now, although we were little and I certainly couldn't be dreaming of taking Fonny from her or anything like that, and although she didn't really love Fonny, only thought that she was supposed to because she had spasmed him into this world, already, Fonny's mother didn't like me. (J. Baldwin).

Supplement Assignment. Analyse the following lexico-semantic and syntactic expressive means and stylistic devices as to their types, functional value and compare with the given translations into Ukrainian:

W. M. Thackeray:

1. All the world used her ill, said this young misanthropist. - " ", .

2. The world is a looking-glass, and gives back to every man the reflection of his own face. Frown at it, and it will in turn look sourly upon you; laugh


 




at it and with it, and it is a jolly kind companion. - - , . - ; ,

- , .

3. She was small and slight in person; pale, sandy-haired, and with eyes habitually cast down: when they looked up they were very large, odd, and attractive; so attractive, that the Reverend Mr. Crisp, fresh from Oxford, and curate to the Vicar of Chiswick, the Reverend Mr. Flowerdew, fell in love with Miss Sharp; being shot dead by a glance of her eyes, which was fired all the way across Chiswick Church. - , , , , , , , , , ׳ , ; , .

4. Oh, why did Miss Pinkerton let such a dangerous bird into her cage?

- Ox, ϳ
?

5. She took advantage, therefore, of the means of study the place offered her. - , , .

6. 'No, never, upon my word,' said the head under the neckcloth, shaking very much. - Hi, , , - .

7. George, of course, took charge of Amelia. She looked as happy as a rose-tree in sunshine. - , , 볿, , .

8. The faithful chambers seem, as it were, to mourn the absence of their masters. The Turkey carpet has rolled itself up, and retired sulkily under the side-board; the pictures have hidden their faces behind old sheets of brown paper; the ceiling-lamp is muffled up in a dismal sack of brown holland; the window-curtains have disappeared under all sorts off shabby envelopes; the marble bust of Sir Walpole Crawley is looking from its black corner at the bare boards and the oiled fire-irons [...] - ³ . , , , .


, , /.../.

9. A tempest in a slop-basin is absurd. We will reserve that sort of thing for the mighty ocean and the lonely midnight. The present Number will be mild. Others - but we will not anticipate those. - - . . . ... .

10. Her roses faded out of her cheeks, and the pretty freshness left her fioure after the birth of a couple of children, and she became a mere machine in her husband's house, of no more use than the late Lady Crawley's grand piano. - ', , , , , .

 

11. That blood-red hand of Sir Pitt Crawley's would be in anybody's pocket except his own. - ϳ - , .

12. She did not pester their young brains with too much learning, but, on the contrary, let them have their own way in regard to educating themselves; for what instruction is more effectual than self-instruction? - , , , , ?

13. 'My mind shudders when 1 think of her awful, awful situation, and that, near as she is to the grave, she should be so given up to vanity, licentiousness, profaneness, and folly.' - , , , , , , , .

 

14. Let us return to Humdrum Hall. - .

15. The captain has a hearty contempt for his father, I can see, and he calls him an old put, an old snob, an old chaw-bacon, and numberless other pretty names. - . , , , , .

16. 'And it's to this man's son -this scoundrel, gambler, swindler, murderer of a Rawdon Crawley, that Matilda leaves the bulk of her money. I say it's unchristian. By Jove, it is. The infamous dog has got every vice except hypocrisy, and that belongs to his brother. ' - / , , , , -


 




? -, ! -. -! , , !

17. 'You, my love, are a little paragon - positively a little jewel - You have more brains than half the shire. - , , . , : .

18. Their house was comfortable; their papa's table rich and handsome [...]. - , - [...].

19. Poor little tender heart! and so it goes on hoping and beating, and longing and trusting. - ! , .

20. While Becky Sharp was on her own wing in the country, hopping on all sorts of twigs, and amid a multiplicity of traps, and pecking up her food quite harmless and successful, Amelia lay snug in her home of Russell Square; if she went into the world, it was under the guidance of the elders; nor did it seem that any evil could befall her or that opulent cheery comfortable home in which she was affectionately sheltered. - , , , , -. , ; , , , , , .

21. was her Europe, her emperor, her allied monarchs and august prince regent. He saw her sun and moon; and I believe she thought the grand illumination and ball at the Mansion House, given to the sovereigns, were especially in honour of George Osborne. - : , , --. ³ . -, , - , .

22. What were her parents doing, not to keep this little heart from beating so fast? - ? , ?

23. {author) I know where she kept that packet she had - and can steal in and out of her chamber like Iachimo - like Iachimo? No - that is a bad


nart. I will only act Moonshine, and peep harmless into the bed where faith and beauty and innocence lie dreaming. - , , , ... ? ͳ, . , ̳ : , , .

24. Holding this kind of conversation, and building numberless castles in
the air (which Amelia adorned with all sorts of flower-gardens, rustic walks,
country churches, Sunday schools, and the like; while George had his mind's
eye directed to the stables, the kennel, and the cellar), this young pair passed
away a couple of hours very pleasantly. - -
(
, , ,
, : - , )
.

Rudvard Kipling:

25. Again the big gong beat, and a second time there was the rushing of naked feet on earth and ringing iron; the clatter of tools ceased. In the silence, men heard the dry yawn of water crawling over thirsty sand. - , . . , , .

26. The dense wet heat that hung over the face of land, like a blanket, prevented all hope of sleep in the first instance. - , , ,

.

27. The heated air and the heavy earth had driven the very dead upward for coolness' sake. - .

28. Then silence follows - the silence that is full of the night noises of a great city. - - . , .

29. All the heat of a decade of fierce Indian summers is stored in the
Pitch-black, polished walls of the cork-screw staircase. - , ,

.


 




30. The city is absolutely quiet now, but for some vagrant dog's love, song. Nothing save dead heavy sleep. -̳ , . ͳ , . , .

'Henry:

J. The imperturbability of the mountains hung upon him like a suit of armor. , .

32. Through it all gleamed a faint protest of cheated youth unconscious of its loss. - , , .

33. Her soul peeped out once through her impassive face, hallowing it. - , .

34. Jud was a monologist by nature, whom Destiny, with customary blundering had set in a profession wherein he was bereaved, for the greater portion of his time, of an audience. - , , , , .

35. The machine sitting at that desk was no longer a man; it was a busy New York broker, moved by buzzing wheels and uncoiling springs. -, , . - - , .

36. The broker's hour is not only crowded, but the minutes and seconds are hanging to all the straps and packing both front and rear platforms. - , .

37. On the Exchange there were hurricanes and landslides and snowstorms and glaciers and volcanoes, and those elemental disturbances were reproduced in miniature in the broker's offices. - , , , .

38. His window was open, for the beloved janitress Spring had turned on a little warmth through the waking registers of the earth. - ³ , .


39. Homeless, they have a hundred homes. They flit from furnished
oom to furnished room, transients forever - transients in abode, transients in

heart and mind. - , . \' , ~ , .

40. The expression on Dodson's face changed in an instant to one of cold ferocity mingled with inexorable cupidity. The soul of the man showed itself for a moment like an evil face in the window of a reputable house. - - . , .

41. The fly in Ikey's ointment (thrice welcome, pat trope!) was Chunk McGowan. - -

.

42. A dead leaf fell in Soapy's lap. That was Jack Frost's card. Jack is kind to the regular denizens of Madison Square, and gives fair warning of his annual call. - . ij . ³ - .

43. And to the waiter he betrayed the fact that the minutest coin and himself were strangers. - , , , - - .

44. Neatly upon his left ear on the callous pavement two waiters pitched Soapy. - , .

45. halted in the district where by night are found the lightest streets, hearts, vows, and librettos. - , , , .

 

46. When one loves one's Art no service seems too hard. - , .

47. Joe was painting in the class of the great Magister - you know his fame. His fees are high; his lessons are light - his highlights have brought him renown. Delia was studying under Rosenstock - you know his repute as a disturber of the piano keys. - . , , . , , . ij - , .


 




48. People here lie down on the floor and scream and kick when you am
the least bit slow about taking money from them. - ,
, !
.

49. In November a cold, unseen stranger, whom the doctors called .
monia, stalked about the colony, touching one here and there with his iCy
fingers. -Ay , ,
, ,
, .

50. Whenever my patient begins to count the carriages in her funeral procession I subtract 50 per cent from the curative power of medicines. - , - .

51. Young artists must pave their way to Art by drawing pictures for magazine stories that young authors write to pave their way to Literature. - , , , ˳.

52. Forty years he had wielded the brush without getting near enough to touch the hem of his Mistress's robe. - ,  , .

53. She told him of Johnsy's fancy, and how she feared she would, indeed, light and fragile as a leaf herself, float away, when her slight hold upon the world grew weaker. - , , , , , ' .

54. Her eyes were shining, and her cheeks showed the delicate pink of life's - real life's approaching dawn. - , - .

55. Manhattan, the night-blooming cereus, was beginning to unfold its dead-white, heavy-odoured petals. - , , -, .

56. Piggy needs but a word. When the girls named him, an undeserving stigma was cast upon the noble family of swine. The words-of-three-letters lesson in the old blue spelling book begins with Piggy's biography. He was fat;


had the soul of a rat. the habits of a bat, and the magnanimity of a cat.

ϳ .

- [.]),

. ϳ ,

: , ,

61)\- , ...

57. With the morbid thirst of the confirmed daily news drinker, he awkwardly folded back the pages of an evening paper, eagerly gulping down the strong, black headlines, to be followed as a chaser by the milder details of the smaller type. - , , , .

58. Outside was one of those crowded streets of the east side, in which, as twilight falls, Satan sets up his recruiting office. .. .here were the children playing in the corridors of the House of Sin. Above the playground forever hovered a great bird. The bird was known to humorists as the stork. But the people of Chrystie Street were better ornithologists. They called it a vulture. - ³ -, , , . ... . . , . - : .

59. Her eyes were shining brilliantly, but her face had lost its color within twenty seconds. - , , .

 

60. It is well that hay fever and colds do not obtain in the healthful vicinity of Cactus City, Texas, for the dry goods emporium of Navarro & Piatt, situated there, is not to be sneezed at. - , -ѳ, , , " " .

61. Old Zizzbaum had the eye of an osprey, the memory of an elephant, and a mind that unfolded from him in three movements like the puzzle of the carpenter's rule. - dz , ' , - , .

62. " shouldn't care to live in it," said the Texan. "Your son and I knocked around quite a little last night. You've got good water, bit Cactus City is better


 




lit up." "We've got a few lights on Broadway, don't you think, Mr. Piatt?" "And a good many shadows," said Piatt. "I think I like your horses best r haven't seen a crowbait since I've been in town." - " . - , , -ѳ ." " , , ?" " , - . - , . ."

63. "Quite unseldom I have been fit to impugn your morals when you have been chewing the rag with me about your conscientious way of doing business. - "Ox , . " ".

64. - 'Jeff,' says he, 'some time when you have the leisure I wish you'd draw off a diagram and footnotes of that conscience of yours.' " - ", - , - , , ,  . ҳ , . "

65. Jeff is in the line of unillegal graft. He is not to be dreaded by widows and orphans; he is a reducer of surplusage. - . : .

66. There was a town down there, as flat as a flannel-cake, and called Summit, of course. - , , , , , .

67. We knew that Summit couldn't get after us with anything stronger than constables and, maybe, some lackadaisical bloodhounds and a diatribe or two in the Weekly Farmer's Budget. - , , , , - - " ".

68. They had the appearance of men to whom life had appeared as a reversible coat - seamy on both sides. - , , .

69. herded sheep for five days on the Rancho Chiquito; and then the wool entered my soul. That getting next to Nature certainly got next to me. I was lonesomer than Crusoe's goat. I've seen a lot of persons more entertaining as companions than those sheep were. - ' ׳, , >


. (1, : . ..(. , .

70. I've got to do something in an intellectual line, if it's only to knock somebody's brains out. - , .

71. "Have you seen or heard of any strangers around here during the past month?" "I have not," says I, "except a report of one over at the Mexican quarters of Loomis' ranch, on the Frio." "What do you know about him?" asks the deputy. "He's three days old," says I. - " , ' ?" "ͳ, , - , , , ' ." " ?" - . " ," - .

72. After indulging himself in a lot more non-communicative information and two thirds of my dinner, the deputy rides away. - , .

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