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Read and translate the following text.

TEXT 1. SIMPLY SOCIALIZING

In the United States, as elsewhere, there is a ritual way to meet and greet people. We follow certain rules or formulas. Along with the handshake, nod of the head, hug, or hand gesture, we engage in small talk. This light conversation or chitchat may not carry much meaning in itself, but, rather,is designed to "break the ice"- to ease into aconversation with someone you have just met. Although the order of questions may vary, the same questions are always asked, and the same remarks made: "How are you?" is answered by "Fine, thanks" or "How are you?" This is not an inquiry into your physical health; it is a standard greeting. A "Fine, thank you" is what is expected, even if your best friend was just diagnosed with a terminal illness.

You always engage in small talk when you first meet someone. If you do not take part in this polite type of repartee, you will be considered rude and unfriendly; therefore, it is essential to learn the formulas. Surprisingly to some, the goal of small talk is to get to know someone, yet you should never ask personal questions too soon; instead, you start with questions or comments that elicit an expected response. This tells you if the person you are talking to is willing to communicate with you and, if so, on what level. You can then decide if you wish to continue talking or not, and whether you can move the conversation in another directions.

Small talk can take place between people who know each other, or at first- time meetings. Obviously, when meeting someone for the first time, you are limited in what you may say and what you may not say. You do not want to be rude by asking personal questions or saying anything negative.

Americans, in particular, engage in so much small talk that they are often seen as superficial or boring. Foreigners may not have the opportunity to see them in a more serious mode and assume they continue to talk about the weather and sports long after they have gone home. Of course, some people do; however, for the most part, small talk is a respective and unnatural type of communication, not typical of private discourse.

In the business world, there is small talk until a relationship is established, after which one may talk specifically about business or personal concerns. After business hours, when socializing with colleagues or associates, you will need to know the acceptable topics of conversation: weather, sports, good news, travel, positive comments about your host country, movies, entertainment, food, or the challenger of learning a foreign language. If asked, you may discuss work, where you live, or where you are staying. After work hours, when people want to relax, discussions about work or anything too serious are usually not welcomed.

Subjects to avoid are: money, prices, personal health, bad news, religion, politics, and details about your family or children (unless specifically asked).

Finally, be careful about jokes! Humor varies from culture to culture, and you may offend without realizing it; there are few things more awkward than an unfunny joke, or one that is in bad taste. People have very specific ideas about good and bad taste; you may be walking on dangerous ground when you attempt a joke and you may never realize how our joke was received because people may laugh out of politeness - or perhaps sympathy.

Small talk may last from a few minutes to over an hour, depending upon circumstances. At its best, it results in a nice impression being made, a common interest being explored, or a rapport created that could be the basis of a future meeting or more serious relationship.

III. Post-reading stage:

3. Consult a dictionary, read and translate the following words:

to greet although to expect to consider personal

a rule to vary to diagnose rude to be willing to

a conversation a remark to take part essential to continue

to ease an inquiry polite surprisingly to move

to be limited to assume a host country to avoid an impression

in particular a relationship entertainment to offend to explore

an opportunity acceptable to relax dangerous a rapport

4. Complete these sentences with the words from the text:

1. In the United States, as elsewhere, there is a ritual way to... .

2. Along with the handshake ... we engage in small talk.

3. This light conversation or chitchat may not carry much meaning in itself, but, rather, is designed to "break the ice"... .

4. If you do not take part in this polite type of repartee, you will be considered ....

5. Surprisingly to some, the goal of small talk is to ... .

6. Small talk can take place between people who ....

7. After business hours, when socializing with colleagues or associates, you will need to know the acceptable topics of conversation ....

8. Subjects to avoid are ... .

9. People have very specific ideas about.... 10. Small talk may last from ....

5. Agree or disagree with the following statements:

1. Just in the United States there is a ritual way to meet and greet people.

2. Along with the handshake, nod of the head, hug, or hand gesture, we engage in small talk.

3. To "break the ice" means to ease into a conversation with someone you have just met.

4. You always engage in small talk when you first meet someone.

5. If you do not take part in this polite type of repartee, you will be considered friendly.

6. The goal of small talk is to get to know someone.

7. You should always ask personal questions when you first meet someone.

8. When meeting someone for the first time, you aren't limited in what you may say and what you may not say.

9. After work hours, when people want to relax, discussions about work or anything too serious are usually not welcomed.

10. People don't have any specific ideas about good and bad taste.

6. Translate the following sentences:

1. .

2. , " "- , .

f .

3. ', .

4. , .

5. , , , .

6. .

7. , , .

8. , , , ', , , , ' .

7. Answer the following questions:

1. What ways of meeting and greeting people do you know?

2. What does it mean "to break the ice"?

3. How can you answer the question "How are you?"

4. Why is it essential to learn the formulas of greeting people?

5. - Why should you never ask personal questions when you first meet someone?

6. Why are Americans often seen as superficial or boring?

7. What acceptable topics of conversation do you know?

8. What are the subjects to avoid?

9. Why do you have to be careful about jokes?

DIALOGUES I. Pre-reading stage:/. Read and learn the following conversational formulas:

Greetings ³

How do you do? ³.

Hello! Hi! (to a friend) ( ).

Good morning! !

Good afternoon! !

Good evening! !

Good night! !

What luck running into you! !

What a lucky chance to meet you! !

Very glad to see you again. .

have not seen you for ages! !

How are you? ?

How goes it? ?

How are things? ?

How's all the family? ?

What's the news? ?

The news is interesting. ֳ .

Bad news has wings. .

No news is good news. ³ - .

How's life? ?

How's your health? ?

Thank you, very well (fine). , .

Thanks, not bad (could be better), , ( ),

(could be worse). ( )

Couldn't be worse. ó .

So-so. .

None too bright. He .

Bright. Great. . .

Lively. .

Never better. .

I am quite well, thank you. , .

Saying Good-bye

Good-bye. . .

Good-bye and good luck. .

Bye-bye (So long). .

See you later (soon). . .

See you tomorrow. .

See you on Sunday. .

Cheerio. (very colloquial).

Acquaintance

Let me introduce you to my friend.

.

Letme introduce captain Kozachenko

to you. .

Let me introduce myself. .

My name is ... ...

I want to introduce you. .

Allow me to introduce you to my wife.

. Permit me to introduce my husband to you.

.

This is my son Igor. .

Meet Mr. Boyko. .

I'd like you to meet my sister, Ann.

.

I'm pleased to meet you Tom. , .

The pleasure is mine. .

I don't think you have met Daniel Jones, ,

have you? .

So am . .

It's mutual. .

I'm happy to make your acquaintance , (to meet you).

I'm delighted to make your acquaintance. ,

. I've been looking forward to meeting you. .

Gratitude

Thank you. .

Many thanks. .

Thanks so much. .

I don't know how to thank you. He , .

I'm very obliged to you. .

So very obliging of you. ' .

I'm very grateful to you. .

Oh, my deep gratitude. .

How kind of you. ' .

Little thanks to you. .

Your kindness is lost upon him. ³ .

Thank you for nothing. .

Don't try to thank me. He .

I am gratified. .

Not at all. He .

Don't mention it. He .

You are welcome. .

It's a pleasure. .

It's nothing. ͳ. .

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